World Restart a Heart Day - 16th October 2018

World Restart a Heart Day Tuesday 16th October 2018

Restart a Heart is a designated yearly day of action with the aim to teach vital life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills to as many people as possible.

This year, Restart a Heart is going global! For the first time, it will be called World Restart a Heart under the oversight of ILCOR – with support from resuscitation councils covering America (North, Central and South), Canada, South Africa, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, as well as Europe. Once again, it will take place on 16 October, although events will occur on and around that date. 
 
Help us to reach our target this year of training 1000 people on the Isle of Wight in how to help save a life.

Last year our efforts were recognised by the Resuscitation Council (UK):

https://www.resus.org.uk/…/communit…/small-island-big-heart

This year we intend to be bigger and better!


Invitations are being sent to schools for years 6, 9 & 10 and to home educated children to attend our free, interactive CPR training.

These sessions will be delivered by Isle of Wight NHS Trust staff, supported by our Community and Co First Responders.

Thanks to the IW Fire & Rescue service we have eight different venues to offer.

We are also offering free sessions to the public at St Mary's Hospital throughout the day and between 15:00-17:00 at the eight fire stations:

Cowes,

East Cowes,

Freshwater,

Newport, 

Ryde,  

Sandown,

Shanklin &

Ventnor


Please like and share our facebook post to raise awareness of the event and help us reach our 1000 target.
#smallislandbigheart #worldrestartaheartday

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Strollers ‘Team Priscilla’ generously donate 2 Public Access Defibrillators (PAD's)

Following their production of Priscilla, The Wight Strollers have generously donated two more Public Access Defibrillators (PAD) bringing their total PAD donations to NINE!

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It was a pleasure to surprise them with the Cardiac Science sponsored cake made by Miss Dotty on Thursday evening. #smallislandbigheart

Past, Present and Future, celebrating 70 years of the NHS

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Past, Present, Future of the NHS – Wednesday 4th July at the Riverside Centre, supported by UNISON.

On Wednesday 4th July, the eve of the birth of the NHS,  Duncan and Helena joined Colleagues from across the NHS Isle of Wight and Community support sector to exhibit in the 70 years 'present' section of 'Past, Present and Future, celebrating 70 years of the NHS'.

The event displayed how the NHS has evolved from it's birth 70 years ago (morning session) through to the current services (afternoon session) that are available to assist people to; self treat, community support services available when help is required and where unavoidable Hospital Care facilities. Also displayed were the NHS Services and community organisations providing supplemental support at the point of discharge from Hospital back to the Community.

 

 

NHS70 Summer Celebration Fete St. Mary's Hospital

NHS70: Celebrating 70 years of the NHS

The National Health Service is turning 70 on 5 July 2018. It’s the perfect opportunity to celebrate the achievements of one of the nation’s most loved institutions, to appreciate the vital role the service plays in our lives, and to recognise and thank the extraordinary NHS staff – the everyday heroes – who are there to guide, support and care for us, day in, day out.

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Helena and Duncan enjoyed teaching CPR to our stand visitors at our NHS Isle of Wight birthday fete on Sunday but soon sort shade by our colleagues major incident vehicle in-between visitors!

Small Island With a Very Big Heart

St Thomas of Canterbury and Shalfleet Primary Schools have become the latest 24/7 Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) sites for the Isle of Wight NHS Ambulance service. This is thanks to the Wight Strollers donating their seventh Public Access Defibrillator and the Savoyards giving an outside wall defibrillator case to the IW NHS Ambulance Service community defibrillator scheme

  The Wight Strollers with the Head Teacher of St Thomas of Canterbury, Maggie Sanderson (third from left) and Louise Walker from IW NHS Trust Ambulance service.

The Wight Strollers with the Head Teacher of St Thomas of Canterbury, Maggie Sanderson (third from left) and Louise Walker from IW NHS Trust Ambulance service.

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‘Words cannot express our sincere gratitude to The Wight Strollers and The Island Savoyards theatre groups for their generosity; they really are true credits to our Island community.
‘We are also extremely grateful to St Thomas of Canterbury and Shalfleet Primary Schools for housing the PAD’s, being our site guardians and allowing these lifesaving devices to be available to the whole community 24/7’
'32 year old Laura Summers of Sandown Bay Academy, who suffered at sudden cardiac arrest whilst at work, is a fine example of why it is just so important that all schools have immediate access to a defibrillator. It’s the safe use of the defibrillator and good quality effective CPR that can increase someone’s chance of survival from an out of hospital cardiac arrest, from as little as 5% to as much as 74%.'

Above quotes from Louise Walker, Head of the ATCoRS

   Shalfleet Primary School proudly shows that their IW NHS Trust defibrillator is now available 24/7 thanks to The Island Savoyards.     From left to right; Paula Blackley, Andrew Woodford (Island Savoyards), Sue Shynn and Louise Walker

Shalfleet Primary School proudly shows that their IW NHS Trust defibrillator is now available 24/7 thanks to The Island Savoyards.

From left to right; Paula Blackley, Andrew Woodford (Island Savoyards), Sue Shynn and Louise Walker

Did you know?

  • A cardiac arrest is when a casualty becomes unconscious and is not breathing normally because the heart has stopped pumping oxygenated blood around the body. 

  • A defibrillator will analyse a casualty’s heart rhythm and will only shock them if needed. 

  • For every minute that passes without defibrillation and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), chances of survival decrease by around ten per cent. 

  • It’s the first three minutes that are absolutely time critical with regards to recognition of cardiac arrest, good quality CPR and early defibrillation.

Information on CPR can be found on the NHS Choices website at

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/first-aid/cpr/

 

Information regarding Defibrillator and First Aid training can be found at www.isleofwightambulance.co.uk

Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is a first aid technique that is needed if someone is unconscious and not breathing normally.

Chest compressions and rescue breaths keep blood and oxygen circulating in the body.

If someone is unresponsive and not breathing normally, call 999 or 112 for an ambulance. Then, if you can, start CPR straight away.

Hands-only CPR

If you have not been trained in CPR or are worried about giving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a stranger, you can do chest compression-only (or hands-only) CPR.

To carry out a chest compression:

  1. Place the heel of your hand on the breastbone at the centre of the person’s chest. Place your other hand on top of your first hand and interlock your fingers.
  2. Position yourself with your shoulders above your hands.
  3. Using your body weight (not just your arms); press straight down by 5–6cm on their chest.
  4. Repeat this until an ambulance arrives.

Try to perform chest compressions at 100-120 compressions a minute.

Notes for Editors

For further information contact Isle of Wight NHS Trust Corporate Communications & Engagement Team on 01983-552003.  Further information about health services can be found at www.iow.nhs.uk or www.nhs.uk.

National Volunteer Week

‘As we celebrate National Volunteer week I would like to personally sincerely thank all our volunteer Community First Responders. The time and commitment they give really does save lives of people on the Isle of Wight.’

Louise Walker, Head of the ATCoRS
 Isle of Wight Ambulance Community First Responders and Fire Co-Responders 2018

Isle of Wight Ambulance Community First Responders and Fire Co-Responders 2018

Community First Responders are local unpaid volunteers who are trained and dispatched by the NHS ambulance service to attend life threatening medical emergencies and provide life support until the arrival of the local statutory NHS Ambulance Service.

Research has shown that in cases of cardiac arrest, fast access to emergency life support skills and equipment can increase pre-hospital survival rates from 5% to as much as 74%. There is also sufficient evidence that in the event of a cardiac arrest where the casualty’s heart is in a shockable rhythm, for every minute that passes without defibrillation their chance of survival decreases by 10%.

Community First Responders usually use their own cars, no blue lights or sirens but being local means they can be on scene with a casualty in just a few minutes. They provide vital support until the arrival of the NHS Ambulance Service sometimes making the difference between life and death.

We currently have nineteen Community First Responder (CFR) volunteers involved in the scheme on the Island and we also have two Co-Responders for the Island; these are Firefighters with medical emergency skills that are tasked and respond for the Ambulance Service.

 ‘I am privileged to manage such a wonderful group of enthusiastic, highly valued, First Responders. Each and every one is an absolute asset to our community and I can’t thank them enough for being part of the scheme. I hope the number of Community First Responders will grow in the areas that most need them.’
Louise Walker, Head of the Ambulance Training & Community Response Services (ATCoRS)

 

These pictures are of just some of the amazing Community First Responders and Co-Responders that help to save lives of people on the Isle of Wight. They attend monthly training and dedicate many of their own hours to meet all the competencies required of them.

If you are interested in volunteering for this scheme, please contact the IW NHS Trust volunteer service by emailing: volunteer@iow.nhs.uk

Emma's Hampshire and Isle of Wight Air Ambulance Charity Skydive

FUNDRAISING SKYDIVE

Emma Baxter is one of our IW NHS Trust Volunteer Community First Responders (CFR). She is trained by the Isle of Wight NHS Trust Ambulance Service to attend certain types of emergency calls that occur in the area she lives. She reaches potential life threatening emergencies in the first vital minutes before our ambulance crew arrives.

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Soon after becoming a CFR Emma’s Mother-in-law, Brother-in-law and her husband all needed the Air Ambulance. This is why Emma felt she needed to repay them in some way and decided to do a charity skydive!

Emma is also a mother to seven children who have all now grown up and she has six grandchildren. She has always cared for people and after changing her life by losing a significant amount of weight she found a new zest for life and thankfully became one of our amazing CFR’s so she could give something back to her community.

Emma is due to jump on 30th June 2018, please help her to raise her target of £375 or even beat it by pledging as much you can; every pound counts so please donate.

You can help Emma raise money for this great cause by donating directly to their fundraising page

https://www.justgiving.com/Emma-Baxter9?utm_source=Sharethis&utm_medium=fundraisingpage&utm_content=Emma-Baxter9&utm_campaign=pfp-email&utm_term=8JBWwQ6kY.

JustGiving sends your donation straight to Hampshire & Isle of Wight Air Ambulance and automatically reclaims Gift Aid if you are a UK taxpayer, so your donation is worth even more.

Alternatively we do have a collection pot held in the IW NHS Trust Ambulance training room, at Unit 18 Barry Way, Newport if you are passing with your loose change.  We are also happy to come and collect any money your area has gathered.


 

Thank you so much for your support!

The ammended Human Medicines Regulations 2017 allows Schools to obtain "spare" adrenaline auto-injector without prescription for use in emergencies *

The ammended Human Medicines Regulations 2017 allows Schools to obtain "spare" adrenaline auto-injector without prescription for use in emergencies *

Schools can purchase Adrenaline auto-injectors from a pharmaceutical supplier, such as a local pharmacy, without prescription, provided the general advice relating to these transactions are observed

Our Volunteer First Responders and Fire Service Co-Responders; saving lives of people on the Isle of Wight

Our Community First Responders are volunteers who are trained by us to attend certain types of emergency calls in the area where they live or work. Also pictured with them are some of the Fire and Rescue Service Co-Responders who attend similar calls. 

Their aim is to reach a potential life threatening emergency in the first vital minutes before the ambulance crew arrives. This picture is of just some of the amazing First Responders and Co-Responders that help to save lives of people on the Isle of Wight.

#Real people saving real lives

 

New legislation allows spare emergency adrenaline auto-injector pens in schools

New legislation allows spare emergency adrenaline auto-injector pens in schools

New legislation was passed in Westminster this week to allow schools in the UK to keep spare adrenaline auto-injectors (AAIs) for emergency use. AAIs deliver a potentially life-saving dose of adrenaline in the event of a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). The legislation comes into effect from 1 October 2017.

Community First Responders

Community First Responders are local unpaid volunteers who are trained and dispatched by the NHS ambulance service to attend life threatening medical emergencies and provide life support until the arrival of the local statutory NHS Ambulance Service.

Research has shown that in cases of cardiac arrest, fast access to emergency life support skills and equipment can increase pre-hospital survival rates from 5% to as much as 74%. There is also sufficient evidence that in the event of a cardiac arrest where the casualty’s heart is in a shockable rhythm, for every minute that passes without defibrillation their chance of survival decreases by 10%.

Community First Responders usually use their own cars, no blue lights or sirens but being local means they can be on scene with a casualty in just a few minutes. They provide vital support until the arrival of the NHS Ambulance Service sometimes making the difference between life and death.

We currently have ten Community First Responder (CFR’s) volunteers involved in the scheme on the Island and we also have two Co-Responders for the Island; these are Firefighters with medical emergency skills that are tasked and respond for the Ambulance Service. We very much welcome our 11 new CFR’s who will soon be joining the team following successful completion of their foundation training.

Our vision is to continue to provide a professional Community First Responder coverage across the Isle of Wight to support the IW NHS Trust Ambulance Service and ultimately increase the number of volunteers we have to provide as much coverage as possible in the geographical areas that need it.

‘I am privilege to manage such a wonderful group of enthusiastic, highly valued, First Responders. Each and every one is an absolute asset to our community and I can’t thank them enough for being part of the scheme. I look forward to the number of Community Responders growing as we complete the recruitment and training process. Over time I hope that we can provide First Responders with local lifesaving skills in the areas that most need them.’ Louise Walker, Head of the Ambulance Training & Community response services (ATCoRS)

If you are interested in volunteering for this scheme, please contact the IW NHS Trust volunteer service by emailing: volunteer@iow.nhs.uk

ATCoRS Hosts Community First Responder Summer Thank You Event

Last Friday we were privileged to enjoy an evening with our wonderful Volunteer Community First Responders and Co Responders as we hosted their summer thank you event, at the Salix Beach Café.

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Our interim CEO Maggie Oldham was present to thank the volunteers for the amazing community work they carry out for us. Chris Smith, Clinical Director and Head of Ambulance also gave a speech saying what an asset the Community First Responder Scheme is to the Ambulance Service and how the volunteers are very much appreciated for all they do.

We currently have total of 12 Community First/Co-Responders with a further 11 soon to be joining the team following successful completion of their foundation training. Community First Responders are local unpaid volunteers who are trained and dispatched by the NHS ambulance service to attend life threatening medical emergencies and provide life support until the arrival of the local statutory NHS Ambulance Service.

Research has shown that in cases of cardiac arrest, fast access to emergency life support skills and equipment can increase pre-hospital survival rates from 5% to as much as 74%. There is also sufficient evidence that in the event of a cardiac arrest where the casualty’s heart is in a shockable rhythm, for every minute that passes without defibrillation their chance of survival decreases by 10%.

Community First Responders usually use their own cars with no blue lights or sirens, but being local means they can be on scene with a casualty in just a few minutes. They provide vital support until the arrival of the NHS Ambulance Service, sometimes making the difference between life and death.


If you would like to know more about becoming a CFR please email: volunteer@iow.nhs.uk or call the ATCoRS team on 534111

The Wight Strollers for their 6th Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) donation

 

The Isle of Wight NHS Ambulance Training & Community Response Services (ATCoRS) would like to sincerely thank:

 

The Wight Strollers for their 6th Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) donation

 

The Wight Strollers have now donated their 6th Public Access Defibrillator (PAD) and it is thanks to such generosity that more lives on the Isle of Wight can be saved. The new PAD is situated on the outside wall of the Island Car Centre, Rookley and we are most grateful to them for becoming a PAD site guardian.

 

‘Once again thank you so much to the Wight Strollers for supporting our Community Defibrillator programme, your passion and drive to raise money for local causes is highly commendable and so very much appreciated.  I look forward to seeing you all in the Island carnivals this year!’ Louise Walker, Head of the ATCoRS

New Public Access Defibrillator in Rookley